Talking to the Subconscious Mind

Decisions are made using our conscious mind and our subconscious mind. Emotional decisions are made at the subconscious level, then justified by the conscious mind. To ignore the subconscious mind when working with others on making decisions is to ignore the decision making part of the group mind. 

In Medical Hypnotherapy (Peaceful Planet Press 2007) Tim Zimmerman Sierra outlines nine rules for effective communication  with the subconscious:

1. Speak in Positive Terms.  This is because the subconscious does not register a negative.  Rather it forms pictures and responds to imagery. Although we consciously understand a negative, our subconscious mind only understands the picture formed. Thus, when speaking in negative terms the subconscious mind only registers a picture and responds to the imagery of the picture. For instance if a golfer tells himself “I don’t want to hit my ball into the water” the subconscious mind pictures the water and images hitting the ball into the water. Id. at 111.

2. Speak in the Present Tense. The subconscious mind is effectively moved if the goal is occurring now.  Mr. Zimmerman Sierra says word  therapeutic suggestions so that the client sees the desired goal happening now. 

3. Paint Pictures. Here we tell our story in a descriptive way calling into play the listeners past similar experience. Then her subconscious mind accesses her picture of a similar experience as she follows us based on her imagery.

4. Give a Reason. The suggestion is more likely to be accepted by the critical faculty of the conscious mind “and passed to the subconscious mind when it is linked to something that seems logical.” Id. at 112. “The subconscious is constantly making associations, and is primarily interested in two types of information-meaning (A means B) and causality (B occurred because of A). Therefore, you give the subconscious what it is looking for by using reasons in your suggestions.”

5.  If too great, make it incremental. To be effective our suggestion must be believable. Thus, if the suggestion seems too big or too far off use incremental suggestion language that indicates change over time: “more and more now,” “every day and in every way,” “becoming,” “growing,” and “greater.”

6. Include Timing. Avoid words like “will,” “soon,” and “tomorrow.” These future words are meaningless to the subconscious.  This is because to the subconscious mind the only time is now in the present moment. “Whenever possible, include specific information about when or under what circumstances the… [suggestion takes place].” Id. at 114.

7.  Suggest Action.  Here we are instructed to suggest to our listener’s subconscious- take action to accomplish what needs to happen. “When suggesting  action, be sure to connect taking the action with achieving the goal… .” Id. 

8. Use Positive Emotions. Strong emotional words help to open the conscious mind and lead to a more powerful impression on the subconscious. Thus, we are to “[u]se words that generate compelling positive images.” Id. at 114. This creates positive imagery that is “emotionalized.” Id.

9.  Specific and Short. Use common easily understood language. Be specific and clear on what the goal is. Refrain from language that is too general. Rather be specific and avoid generalizations. 

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