Zen

Zen says enlightenment comes in everyday actions. There is no action that is taken for granted. Rather every action is lived fully in the moment without thinking about the past or the future.

Fritjof Capra, in The Tao oF Physics, discusses Zen Practice as follows:

We are fortunate to have a wonderful description…in Eugen Herrigel’s little book Zen in the Art of Archery. Herrigel spent more than five years with a celebrated Japanese master to learn his “mystical” art, and he gives us in his book a personal account of how he experienced Zen through archery. He describes how archery was presented to him as a religious ritual which is “danced” in spontaneous, effortless and purposeless movements. It took him many years of hard practice, which transformed his entire being, to learn how to draw the bow “spiritually”, with a kind of effortless strength, and to release the string “without intention,” letting the shot “fall from the archer like a ripe fruit.” When he reached the height of perfection, bow, arrow, goal and archer melted into one another and he did not shoot, but “it” did it for him.

 F. Capra, The Tao oF Physics, (Shambhala 2010) at 126.

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